And then comes the thunderbolt

By Stephen. August 17th, 2010

Saul has a marvelously dark sense of humor.

In Mortality Distilled, Saul has spent his first day working at Cedar Manor nursing home, and is now driving home. He had been a physician in the 19th century, but left the profession when he came to believe (accurately, as matters would show) that he was doing more harm than good. Based on this experience, he is deeply cynical about the entire medical profession.  However,

“He would have to grant at least this much to the current powers of medicine: at no other time in history could so many people have been retained alive in such an advanced state of decay. Cedar Manor was mortality distilled.”

The remainder of the installment consists mostly of self-reflection, and, I must add, illustrates a type of moral courage that I personally can only aspire to.

And then comes the thunderbolt. — Stephen

3 Comments

  1. c says:

    that’s a first for me hearing that. it takes a doctor to admit his horrendous wrong doings. these days legally, it’s bad to admit a mistake, cos it means they’re get sued or taken off their practice.

  2. c says:

    that’s a first for me hearing that. it takes guts for a doctor to admit his horrendous wrong doings. these days legally, it’s bad to admit a mistake, cos it means they’re get sued or taken off their practice.

  3. c says:

    i thought saul was going to get the sleep drug injection!!??

    Lackman and Baehl are the same person all together?

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